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Forum: Hot Heads Tech Talk

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edufriesen
starter


Can anyone tell me how many amps does the hot heads mini starter draw. I'm relocating the battery to the rear and want to install an adequate circuit breaker. Thanks for your time, Ed Friesen
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on: Thu 15 of Nov, 2018 [18:12 UTC] reads: 516

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hemistude
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Re: starter
on: Tue 20 of Nov, 2018 [15:36 UTC] score: 0.00
> Can anyone tell me how many amps does the hot heads mini starter draw. I'm relocating the battery to the rear and want to install an adequate circuit breaker. Thanks for your time, Ed Friesen

Ed, You might want to review this page before deciding to protect that circuit.

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/355936/why-arent-starter-circuits-protected

I don't advocate either way but I do know that I've never heard of anyone who has done this. I have a Dodge Magnum R/T that has the OEM battery in the rear and I'm pretty certain that OEM's don't feel the need for that protection. My Studebaker has a rear mounted battery and I have the cable routed along the frame through properly spaced insulated clamps and grommets, directly to the Ford-style starter solenoid (also frame mounted.) My main power comes off of the battery/starter cable right at the solenoid before going to the fuse panel and is protected by a properly sized fusible link within in the first four inches. This safely isolates the Power to the vehicle electrical system from the Power going to the starter motor.

I think carefully spec'ing the gauge size of the long starter cable battery is your most important task. The longer the cable, the larger gauge you'll need to supply the same amount of current flow to the starter.

I guess you could create your own high-capacity fusible link inside a closed junction box to give the large cable a designed "weak point" so a dead short would cause it to burn through at a specific place rather than randomly setting something on fire.

It is definitely an interesting topic. I wonder if anyone on this forum has had any real life experience with protecting the hi-amp starting circuit. Good luck Ed.

Dave


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